Who Needs Rulers?

Want to draw perfectly straight lines without a ruler? Now you can.

leslienayibe:

thedailywhat:

Life-Altering Line-Drawing Instrument Design Concept of the Day: Giha Woo’s “Constrained Ball” can be attached to any standard writing instrument to assist in the production of ruler-free lines. In addition, the device has a built-in LCD screen which displays the total length of any line drawn.

As others have noted, this would likely require at least one additional gear to create functional stability, but an interesting concept nonetheless.

[yanko.]

Living in the Future

“Back when I was a boy, I bought a children’s book at my town’s library book sale called “2010: Living in the Future” by Geoffrey Hoyle. Written in 1972, it had been withdrawn from the library’s collection by the mid-80s, when I picked it up. I’ve somehow managed to hang onto it for 25 years and now, suddenly, here we are: 2010. I’m reproducing this long out-of-print book here to see how we’re doing. Are we really living in the future?” – via 2010book:

At nine o’clock it is time for school. Inside a large closet in your bedroom there is a vision phone and vision desk. As soon as you dial your school number, the screen lights up, and there is your teacher.

In 2010 your home is your classroom. The teacher’s classroom is in his or her home. In the teacher’s room there are many vision screens connected to the vision phone. On these screens the teacher can see all the children in the class.

Opposite the screens there is a blackboard. Whatever the teacher writers on the board can be seen on the children’s vision desks.

New Interactive Augmented Reality Experience by T-Immersion

Total Immersion have launched a new kind of interactive attraction using mobility and augmented reality. This new attraction developed in cooperation with Hanwa Co. (Japan) is a state of the art walk through where guests are swept into an experience merging videogame and real live adventure:

Before entering in the attraction, guests are equipped with a backpack and a video gun (with an infrared camera, one LCD display and a trigger). Guests have to use the video gun to progress inside the horror house and find ghosts. As soon as the ghost is found, guests have to shoot it to collect points and succeed their mission.

T-Immersion are using AR really effectively in this instance, in what I think is a quite impressive videogame-like scenario. This is a departure for T-Immersion, who have formerly been focused on installation-based & and webcam-based AR.

Does this give anyone any good ideas for other, more meaningful AR interactions? Let me know in the comments.